5/19/12

Eau Sauvage Parfum (Dior)


Here's how I would have done Eau Sauvage in parfum form, using the same ingredients as Francois Demachy:

The top note would have been a rich (but not piercing) bergamot, the kind found in the finest Earl Grey tea. The tart citrus would metamorphose into a bright, grassy vetiver, very bitter green, and very fresh. Within twenty minutes the vetiver would darken and become rootier, smokier, yielding its verdancy to mysterious myrrh. An hour later, this smoky vetiver would lighten, its roots giving way to sweet myrrh, touched in the end by a lick of lingering bergamot.

Had Demachy gone this route, I would be inclined to purchase a bottle. Sadly, things did not go my way. Eau Sauvage Parfum has no top notes to speak of. It careens onto skin, all ingredients accounted for, and smells blob-like: thick, sour, and brownish-green.

Within five minutes, the blob begins to resolve into peripheral renditions of myrrh and vetiver, with the vetiver rapidly taking the fore. And what a gorgeous vetiver it is, so incredibly smoky and deep, with intensification attributable to the persistent myrrh. At this stage the myrrh is not sweet, but burnt-smelling, adding to the fire. It's a very oriental feel, something perfect for a crisp autumn day.

But it doesn't last long enough - after twenty minutes, the myrrh withdraws, and leaves naked vetiver, still smelling smoky, but not quite like before. Somewhere in the shadowy cloud are hints of jasmine, very velvety smooth, and just a tiny bit sweet. It's probably Hedione, which was debuted all those years ago in the original version. Ten minutes on, the vetiver has weakened considerably, achieving a brightness that I expected to smell earlier on in this perfume. The culprit is bergamot, now stepping forward to reveal itself as a supporting note! It's a pleasantly bitter citrus, and it twinkles like a green star in the vetiver's twilight.

At the forty-five minute mark the fruit has sweetened, and suddenly the only thing radiating from my skin is a lone myrrh note. It smells a little sweet, a little spicy, a little green, and a little too little. Where's the rest of Eau Sauvage Parfum? This is it? Seventy-five minutes into its evolution, the myrrh proves to be the final straw to this scent's progression, and simply fades into a gauzy white haze.

Eau Sauvage Parfum smells more like an eau de parfum, but I'm nitpicking. In short, this scent is a smoky vetiver/myrrh accord, with just a transitional touch of bergamot lurking under its grey-green cloak. I'm sure it'll be pleasant to wear in October and November, when nature's greens are touched with campfire smoke and the smell of burning leaves, but as a summer fragrance it fails miserably. There's just no way I could wear this on a 95° day in July. I'd rather wear Guerlain Vetiver, or even Grey Vetiver.

Sephora is currently selling Eau Sauvage Parfum, but it's not flying off the shelves. I'm guessing the original will remain more popular, and that' probably for the better.









8 comments:

  1. Nice picture of Alain Delon made in 1966... Note the missing cigarette: http://sansure.over-blog.com/article-33906721.html

    I will check this one out when I have the chance.

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    1. Thanks for the link! Yeah that was one minute in Photoshop. The wonders of our digital age.

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  2. Ah, curse it! I had hopes for this one. (BTW, let me know if you want some Eau Savage Extreme. I finally picked up a bottle. I think you said you had either tried it and liked it or wanted to try it?)

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    1. Sorry to disappoint, but then again you may have a different take, or as is often said in forums, "YMMV."

      ES Extreme is on the list, I'll keep you posted when I'd like to review it. Thanks for the heads up! I understand it's one of your favorite versions.

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  3. I sniffed both Eau Sauvage and Eau Sauvage Parfum on paper last week. It's evident that Eau Sauvage Parfum draws inspiration from Eau Sauvage. Whereas Eau Sauvage slowly loses its potency Eau Sauvage Parfum goes on and on. I love the vetiver and myrrh, the resinous myrrh last long.

    Eau Sauvage is very nice and lightweight for warm weather but Eau Sauvage Parfum really brings home the bacon in cooler weather.

    The bottle looks great too, it sports a magnetic cap. Eau Sauvage Parfum is the next scent I'm gonna buy. Love it. I may even buy Eau Sauvage next year as my current warm weather scent is Dior Homme Sport.

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    1. Glad you liked it, Bert. It's a nice one, but not for me I'm afraid. I can definitely see it working wonders in cooler weather. The irony is, the weather has been unseasonably cool this spring here in Connecticut, and I've already given it a cool-weather test! So there are no surprises there for me, sadly enough. But I think I will give it another go come September/October. The bottle for ES Parfum is truly gorgeous. They did a great job there.

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  4. Did you revisit this Bryan? I was so impressed I actually bought it on the spot...very rare for me to do that for a current designer frag. Insane longevity 24+ even more on fabric.

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    1. I did sample it again and was again relatively unimpressed, although I'm not through with it by a long shot. So far though I'm not sure how it garners so much love. Agree its longevity is good. Still think the original is far superior to it.

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