4/12/14

Krizia Uomo (Krizia)



This is a beautiful fragrance, and I'm glad to own it. Here's the deal with Krizia Uomo: it's an aromatic fougère that smells a little like a hybrid chypre in the same vein as Antaeus. I attribute this to the generous woods in its base, namely cedar, a touch of sandalwood, and vetiver. Like Antaeus, Uomo smells fairly natural and conservative, something a buttoned-up Wall Street maverick might have worn back when the world of American finance still appeared to be populated by human beings. Unlike Antaeus, it also smells barbershoppy and clean, its green notes blending with a mild coumarin and musk accord reminiscent of ferns like Azzaro and Paco Rabanne PH.

I own the current moss-less formula, and I know older versions were burlier, probably a bit richer, and doubtlessly louder than what Uomo is today, although I should mention that the brand has undergone another update, with a modernized box and bottle design. It's just a guess, but I'd say the "newest" Uomo is probably even tamer than the final incarnation of its original breed. It looks like they gave this scent a major overhaul, but then again, maybe not. In any case, I think I'll be buying a back-up bottle of the stuff pictured above, just to have the familiar version on hand for a bit longer. Amazingly, Uomo costs a mere $13 on Amazon, so keeping an extra bottle is no big deal.

Despite the absence of moss, the newer Uomo smells quite rich and natural, with a "clean mountaintop breeze" of lemon, grass, pine, and juniper top notes, dressed in aldehydes. Within fifteen minutes a pleasant lavender note whistles in the wind, its simple tune falling across fields of geranium leaf, cilantro, basil, and vetiver. Coumarin adds a bit of softness and also balances the bitterness of the herbs, and by lunchtime a solid cedar note anchors everything to a seafoam-green musk. This exercise in both clarity and diffusion creates a striking balance in the drydown, perhaps its most distinctive trait. Uomo is a great everyday work scent, very dependable, masculine, and alluring. Thank goodness fragrances like it still exist.






8 comments:

  1. This is one of my favorite fragrances. I didn't know they re-released it or changed the bottle. Does the new version really smell a lot different than before, or is that just your guess? I have 3 bottles of what I assume is an older version, but I'd love to try out the current stuff. I'm not a reformulation snob, and it's interesting to see how they updated it, if at all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you don't mind the removal of oakmoss, you'll probably like the new stuff. It's dirt cheap, so you can't go wrong.

      Delete
    2. I was thinking about what you said about this being reformulated. A couple of weeks ago, I bought two spare bottles of Krizia Uomo at Perfumania (they were super cheap), and although the bottles themselves look the same as my original old bottle, the boxes look different, so I wondered if they were reissues. I think they are, because they smell quite a bit different than my old bottle, and smell basically as you describe. It's a bit weaker, and with less of a mossy smell, but you know what, I actually like it better! If this is a reissue, Krizia did a great job, because it smells a lot better balanced than my old bottle. More of an aromatic fougere smell, kind of like a green Azzaro Pour Homme. My old bottle is a super strong powerhouse, and is great, but I like the smell of the juice in these newer bottles better. A bit weaker, yes, but it smells like Krizia Uomo with a little more care put into blending the ingredients. I don't mind reformulations like this at all.

      Delete
  2. Reporting back on my new bottle. I sprayed one spritz on my arm about 8 hours ago, and it's still going strong. This clearly smells better than my old bottle. First, it's a lot smoother, and even better, it is REALLY leathery. The leather in the old stuff was subtle and in the background. On this newer bottle, it's much more up front and it adds a lot to the scent.

    I'm not sure if I have the same version you have, though, because the bottle looks exactly like my old one. The box is different, though.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Just looked on the back of the box - like you said, oakmoss (or punastri) is not listed, though it lists a ton of other ingredients like linalool, citronallelol or whatever. My old box does not list any ingredients at all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm thinking you have the same version as me. Somehow I doubt that they spent a ton of time re-tooling this formula since the major IFRA-compliant reform of a few years ago. I'm glad you like this! Krizia Uomo is an example of how brands can get beyond the conventional wisdom of post-IFRA ruination and actually embrace positive change.

      People get wedded too firmly to the idea that the removal of ingredients like oakmoss and birch tar are deal breakers. It's true that some things shouldn't be without oakmoss (I'm afraid to know what the most recent version of Grey Flannel smells like), but the truth is that these materials aren't necessary to make a great fragrance. It takes skill with synthetics and IFRA compliant naturals, but it can be done. The current Krizia Uomo is an excellent cedar-rich (non hamster cagey) fougere type of masculine, very crisp, complex, and worth far more than either of us paid for it.

      Delete
  4. Yep, I'm with you. I always thought of KU as a powerhouse, though I'm not sure this new version qualifies. Frankly, I don't care because this new stuff is better. If I want monster sillage, I'll just spray on more. No big deal.

    I've reviewed KU many times, relying on my one old bottle for the reviews. I've always given it a 9/10 rating. With this new stuff, I'd give it a perfect 10/10.

    I'm glad you wrote your review. I bought those two new bottles totally as spares, having no clue they may have been different from what I already had. If I hadn't read your review, I wouldn't have even cracked open a bottle until I finished my old one!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, to me the "powerhouse" designation is great, but not all important. In many ways it's the reason these classics were reformulated in the first place, as intense strength doesn't comport with contemporary trends in fragrance. By easing up on concentration, brands have made application more "user friendly" for wearers. Want more power? Use more.

      Delete

Thank you for your comment. It will be visible after approval by the moderator.